To See the Face of God

The following post is a modified version of the “remembrance” I offered at my daughter’s celebration of life on January 30, 2022. Elizabeth Anne died on December 21, 2021, just hours shy of her 29th birthday.

“Take my love/For love is everlasting /And remember the truth that once was spoken/To love another person/Is to see the face of God.”

When my daughter, Elizabeth, was a preschooler, I took her for the first time to see the musical Les Miserables – and these beautiful lines tie the entire theatrical piece together as all of the actors merge on stage in the finale.  The line “to love another person is to see the face of God” hangs in the air as the full chorus joins.

For those who have not had the joy of experiencing this three-hour musical, the storyline is based on the 19th century novel by Victor Hugo.  It is a story of redemption – of love, not just between partners, but the deep love between parent and child and the love that connects humanity – of revolution – of kindness – of second chances – of untimely death – death before life even really begins.

Despite being precocious, I’m pretty sure my 5-year-old didn’t grasp the full message of the musical, and yet, the lessons were not wasted on her.  Time and again, Elizabeth waged her own revolution – a revolution of kindness and action.  She believed in the inherent good of all people, and she believed that collectively we are called to make this world a better place.  Les Miserables created a space for my daughter to realize how deeply intertwined all of our lives are.

It is no surprise, then, that after being diagnosed with a brain tumor her junior year in college, Elizabeth wanted to control the narrative – to use her story to teach others to live – to help others realize their own interconnectivity to others.  As her mother, I marveled at her inherent ability to bring people together – to inspire them to live their best lives – to control their own actions and reactions to events over which they have no control.

For the last 8 years, Elizabeth was determined to NOT be defined by her brain tumor.  It was early – perhaps days after her seizure in Denmark – that she adopted the mantra, “She stood in the storm, and when the wind did not blow her way, she adjusted her sails.”  In fact, she used the tag line “Adjust Your Sails” to center her own story, and to teach the rest of us that we are not defined by the circumstances of life – that we choose our responses – our actions – our words.

To say that her journey was an easy one or one that wasn’t filled with fear, sadness, or even anger, would not be honest.  Elizabeth – like all of us – had anxiety about the future.  In 2019, when we believed she was simply going to have a second brain surgery, the neurologist’s news that she had an inoperable second tumor as well as an invasive cancer of her spinal fluid took her breath away.

And yet – even in the midst of facing stage four brain cancer – she looked for ways to use her journey to teach the rest of us how to truly live – how to pay attention to the tiny details of life – you know, the ones we often miss or take for granted:  the snuggles or kisses from a doting dog, the joy of music, the gift of ice cream, the bear hug from a friend, the soft touch of a hand on the shoulder, or the beauty of flowers.  She taught us not to get hung up in the things over which we have no control and to understand that at the end of the day, love is really the only thing that matters.

Over the past two years, Elizabeth and I had the gift of spending a lot of time together.  We talked about her hopes and dreams that would never transpire.  We talked about all she had accomplished as a young person, and we talked about the legacy she was leaving through her passion for raising funds for brain tumor research.  After all, not many people facing their own mortality weave hundreds of hot pads to raise thousands of dollars.  We talked about how the lessons of her life and the Adjust Your Sails mantra were reaching people she would never know.

And we talked about the moment when family and friends would gather to celebrate her life – the moment when I could share what she wants the world to know:  to remember that we have one shot at every day and those days are limited; to spend time on relationships that matter; to let go those situations or relationships that don’t bring us joy; to see the good in the world; to be the good through our actions and our words; and to love deeply.  After all, “to love another person is to see the face of God,” and because loved and have been loved by Elizabeth, I have seen the face of God.

Elizabeth Anne filled this world with light and love

6 thoughts on “To See the Face of God

  1. Heather, I am glad you put some words into the world. This is beautiful, as is the way Elizabeth approached life. I hope you know that to love is something that is learned. Elizabeth had a momma with a full heart and she learned to love. In a beautiful circle, she also taught others how to love. Remember, it is okay to be slow in stacking words. xo, ruth

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  2. Your vulnerability in sharing such a personal journey humbles me. I can’t imagine what you have been through and yet, here your words glimmer with love. The kind of love that passes understanding. How a mother loves her child forever. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. What a gift your lovely daughter left to the world. And what a gift you’ve given to us with your words. I’ve pulled a mantra from what Elizabeth wants us to know: “See the good, be the good, love deeply.”

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  4. I’ve seen Les Miserables on Broadway. No words for how profound an experience – the songs remain my favorite of all musicals. They echo in my head almost daily. Yes – it’s all about redemption (my favorite of themes) and love. Deep and real love, sacrificial and eternal, that transcends death. I remember reading of your daughter’s valiant battle – and yours, on her behalf. How lovely a girl; how amazing, her legacy of courage. I mourn for her loss and am pierced by the beauty of your words here, encapsulating her life. Her messages to look for the good and to love deeply are exactly the reminders we need – for God is love. He is eternal. He is here. We can see Him. Thank you and bless you-

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